Experimenting with custom splint design

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This family wanted the support of thermoplastic splint with the comfort of neoprene, so I combined both. 

I made the custom splint in a traditional manner by tracing her hand, melting aquaplast, and forming it to her hand. I left the forearm trough as a plastic stay to keep the wrist straight. 

I measured her forearm for the neoprene and sewed straps and d-rings to it. I attached the neoprene to the aquaplast with rivets because I thought it would be the most secure option. I lined the inside with padding to make it nice and comfortable.

I used 1/16″ aquaplast and there is a little give to them. I find a slight dynamic component is so important. The client tolerates them well and is maintaining her range of motion.

Dynamic Wrist Extension Splint

I had a client with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who was limited in wrist extension. Her doctor had requested I make a splint to increase range of motion in wrist extension. I could have made a static splint and remolded it as she progressed, but it didn’t seem like the best option. I did a little research online, and found a dynamic design. I’ve never made a dynamic splint before, but I was willing to try it. 
 On this splint, there is a piece that fits on the dorsal side of the forearm and the fingers slide into the oval shape and rest at the MCP joints. There are two small hooks. One at the far side of the forearm and one at the fingers. A rubber band is secured around the hooks and provides a consistent stretch into wrist extension. The hinge at the wrist allows her to flex her wrist and use her hand functionally. As she progressed, I used tighter rubber bands and eventually twisted them around several times to provide a greater stretch. She went from neutral wrist extension to 70 degrees.

I had a client with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who was limited in wrist extension. Her doctor had requested I make a splint to increase range of motion in wrist extension. I could have made a static splint and remolded it as she progressed, but it didn’t seem like the best option. I did a little research online, and found a dynamic design. I’ve never made a dynamic splint before, but I was willing to try it.

On this splint, there is a piece that fits on the dorsal side of the forearm and the fingers slide into the oval shape and rest at the MCP joints. There are two small hooks. One at the far side of the forearm and one at the fingers. A rubber band is secured around the hooks and provides a consistent stretch into wrist extension. The hinge at the wrist allows her to flex her wrist and use her hand functionally. As she progressed, I used tighter rubber bands and eventually twisted them around several times to provide a greater stretch. She went from neutral wrist extension to 70 degrees.

Pencil Grasp Assist for Muscular Dystrophy

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This is an adaptive device I made that is used with clients who have difficulty grasping a pencil. It maintains the fingers in a pinch. It is typically used for people with muscular dystrophy.

*Disclaimer: this is not my original design